Free Book and Art Print Sale!!!

Free Book and Art Print Sale!!!

If you would like to receive an email each time I post, please subscribe to my blog.

Bootlegger Haze (Book One–The Saga) is available for free!  

Amazon  *  iBookstore  *  Kobo

Get your copy today.

Bootlegger Haze--Book One

Art prints inspired by characters and scenes from Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) are available.  

Read all of my posts for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge here  http://katrinaparkerwilliams.wordpress.com/30-paintings-in-30-days-challenge-sept-2014/.

 

I am participating in Leslie Saeta’s 30 Paintings in 30 Days Art Challenge for September 2014.  I have decided to work with a theme for the September Challenge.  I am calling it my “Trouble Down South Art Challenge.”  This title is taken from my short story collection Trouble Down South and Other Stories and from my Bootlegger Haze (Book One and Book Two Series).

 

As many of my readers know, I am an artist and an author of historical fiction and Southern short stories.  You can view my books and short stories here.  I have decided to paint scenes from my books and short stories as part of the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge.  In my paintings, I hope to capture my interpretation of the scenes, characters, and landscapes  from my books and short stories as I envision them.  I will also post snippets and excerpts from my books and short stories here on my blog for my readers to view.  

Order your art print today.  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com to purchase art prints.

Available Sizes:

8 x 10 inches (unframed) —  $20.00 (shipping included)

11 x 14 inches (unframed) —  $30.00 (shipping included)

16 x 20 inches (unframed) —  $45.00 (shipping included)

 

 

 

*****
I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.
Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.
Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  SmashwordsKoboBarnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Art Challenge–Painting No. 22

Trouble Down South Art Challenge

Painting No. 22

Day22

A Corrupt Mississippi Officer–1920

My next paintings will deal with characters and scenes from my Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta.  The Hankering, a colored 1920’s juke joint or barrelhouse, was subject to be raided on a regular basis by a corrupt white Mississippi Sheriff and his Deputy henchmen.  They would shake down the barrelhouse owners, demanding a cut of their take to keep from hauling all of their customers down to the jail and running them out of business.  Hawk was determined to end this practice once and for all.  Read more below.

 

Excerpt

Before anyone could make a move, the front door of the joint came crashing down, two burly, white officers rushing in with rifles pointed at all the patrons. Within seconds of the invasion, the back door was caved in, two more white officers racing in with rifles and pistols aimed at the startled crowd.

“Oh, shit,” Ton Stone said. “Just what we needed.”

“Everybody to the wall!” Deputy Avery shouted. “Get your face to the wall, I said, dammit. Right now!”

Intoxicated men and women jumped up and pressed their sweat-soaked, fully inebriated bodies against the wall, some using the wall as a respite from their intoxication, and for others, their highs blown by the invasion into the one place they felt was their own.

Buford Tee and Ton Stone followed suit, not wanting any trouble, particularly Ton Stone, who was one day from leaving this hell hole called the South.

The ex-husband, who had been raided on a regular basis, had grown tired of the shake downs from the corrupt officers. He had paid a pretty penny to them to keep them at bay, but it seemed only to fuel the fire, their demanding more money each time they raided his establishment and their exerting more control over him with each unwanted visit.

“What the hell is this?” he shouted.

“Now, Hawk, you know the drill,” Deputy Avery said. “Cough it up, or your patrons going down to the jailhouse.”

Hawk shook his head, gritting his teeth and cursing the lead officer under his breath, and then he headed to the bar where he had stashed the evening’s till, pulling out a wad of cash and giving it to Deputy Avery, who didn’t even count it.

“Two hundred. Hum. Good work, Hawk. Next week, make it three,” he said, pointing to the newest officer. “Got another one on the payroll, you know.”

The officers started backing out of the joint, their guns still pointed at the patrons, and particularly at Hawk. Deputy Avery was the last to depart, eyeing Miss Carmelia, who had just entered the joint, her face red and bruised on the left side. “I see you can’t control that temper of yours again, Hawk,” Deputy Avery mocked.

Hawk turned to see Miss Carmelia standing at the counter.

“Such a pretty face. Too bad she’s a colored whore,” he added.

With that last comment, Hawk pulled a knife from his back pocket, flicked it open, and tossed it with magnified force at the Deputy who had, simultaneously, lifted his shotgun and fired, the bullet tearing into Hawk’s chest, the force of which propelled him backward into the bar, knocking it over and pinning Miss Carmelia under it. The bouncer pulled his gun to shoot the Deputy, but it was unneeded, the knife slicing into his right eye, paralyzing his body, which seemed to take a moment to collapse. The other officers rushed back inside to see what had happened, the bouncer throwing his gun under a table.

“What the hell happened here?” one of the officers yelled.

“Deputy Avery shot Hawk,” the bouncer said. “And Hawk killed him dead.”

Like chickens with their heads wrung off, the Deputies ran around the joint trying to act tough, harassing the patrons who, repeatedly, said the same statements, “I ain’t seen nothing, Sir. My face was in the wall.”

Frustrated, the Deputies left the colored patrons to tend to Hawk’s body. Two of the officers dragged Deputy Avery’s body out of the joint and placed it in the squad car.

 

***

 

Prints are available for purchase of the painting “A Corrupt Mississippi Officer-1920.”   Prints are available in sizes 8 x 10, 11 x 14, and 16 x 20 inches (unframed).  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com for prices.

Check out the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta–http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com/.

 

*****

 

I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.

Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.

Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  Smashwords, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Art Challenge–Painting No. 21

Read all of my posts for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge here  http://katrinaparkerwilliams.wordpress.com/30-paintings-in-30-days-challenge-sept-2014/.

Trouble Down South Art Challenge

Painting No. 21

Day21

The Hankering

My next paintings will deal with characters and scenes from my Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta.  The Hankering is a juke joint in my novel Bootlegger Haze (Book One–The Saga).  It is owned by Miss Carmelia Faye Lafayette and her ex-husband, Hawk.  Read more below.

 

Excerpt

The Hankering was located down by the railroad in Wayne County, open only on weekends, the only time most Coloreds had off work. It was a place for them to get away from weightiness of the workweek, and particularly, from their white employers, to enjoy a night or two of drinking, of course, but gambling, a little sex, or rather a lot of sex, and dancing also satisfying the desires of the patrons.

Locals made their way to the Hankering in a variety of ways: on horseback, by horse-drawn wagon loaded down with patrons, and even on tractors, on loan for the evening from their employers, pulling flatbed trailers filled with men and women desiring an evening of unbridled pleasure and unadulterated entertainment.

Deputy Avery of Wayne County and some of his officers would sit in their Model T Ford squad cars, watching as the colored folk made their way to the barrelhouse. They’d wait until an hour before midnight to raid the place, when most folks were torn down from drunkenness, and as they put it, involving themselves in all manner of sin and debauchery.

A piano player beat out tunes on the old Steinway piano as colored men and women in their best going-out clothes—women in fitted dresses designed to attract the attention of their male suitors and the men in clean shirts and dungarees, worn only for a night out on the town—strutted their stuff on the wooden plank dance floor, jiggling and twisting, bopping and dipping, their unrestrained dance movements ignited by the lightning bolt effects of the bootleg liquors and beers they consumed.

The owner would set out a barrel of bootleg whiskey and a chock barrel of homemade beer, and men and women with tin cups would dip them in the barrel and partake of the mind-numbing, sense-altering brews. One or two cups would set them up right, but more than that would knock them out. Most folks could handle one or two cups, but not too many could handle much more than that, although many had tried. Those crazy enough to test their mettle would fall prey and be sidelined against the wall of the barrelhouse until the effects wore off; oftentimes, it’d be late the next day before they would make their way back home.

***

Prints are available for purchase of the painting “The Hankering.”   Prints are available in sizes 8 x 10, 11 x 14, and 16 x 20 inches (unframed).  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com for prices.

Check out the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta–http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com/.

*****

I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.

Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.

Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  Smashwords, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Art Challenge–Painting No. 20

Trouble Down South Art Challenge

Painting No. 20

2 August's Gourd Banjo

August’s Gourd Banjo

My next paintings will deal with characters and scenes from my Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta.  August crafts a banjo from a gourd, and his grandson, Buford Tee, finds it very interesting.  Read more below.

 

Excerpt

The next morning, August awoke to the faint sounds of plucked strings, emanating from his banjo downstairs. He stirred slowly, his back having stiffened from the damp, wintry air that had bathed the room during the night. He had not lit a fire in his room the previous night and regretted it now. He sat upright in his discolored union suit, arching his back and rubbing his neck. Then he got out of bed and pulled on his overalls and cotton shirt that lay across the back of the spindled-back rocking chair. After sliding into his night slippers, he eased down the stairs, not wanting to wake Marie Claire who seemed to need all the rest she could get last night, too exhausted to even eat the supper he had fixed for her.

As he descended the stairs, he looked down, finding Buford Tee squatted on the floor at the base of the stairs, his small body hunched over the gourd banjo, examining its design and testing it for sound.

“Ahem,” August said, clearing his throat as he stepped down into the foyer.

Startled, Buford Tee let the banjo drop to the floor, making a thud sound and whirring noises as the rounded base of the gourd wobbled back and forth.

“I’m sorry, Sir,” Buford Tee said nervously, afraid he had broken it, but knowing he shouldn’t have been playing with it as his mama had warned against it the night before.

He stood abruptly and leaned against the newel, waiting for August to strike him, his slim body plastered to the post.

“What’s got you all up in a tether, boy?” August asked, noticing the terror that had swept across the boy’s face.

Buford Tee looked down at the banjo, and August followed. The banjo was undamaged.

 

***

Prints are available for purchase of the painting “August’s Gourd Banjo.”   Prints are available in sizes 8 x 10, 11 x 14, and 16 x 20 inches (unframed).  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com for prices.

Check out the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta–http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com/.

*****

I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.

Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.

Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  Smashwords, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Art Challenge–Painting No. 19

Trouble Down South Art Challenge

Painting No. 19

1 Winston's Stopwatch

Winston’s Gold Fusee Pocket Watch

My next paintings will deal with characters and scenes from my Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta.  Winston Byron is a character from Bootlegger Haze (Book One–The Saga).  Read an excerpt.

Excerpt

On one occasion Buford Tee, curious about Winston’s pocket watch dangling from his coat pocket, picked it up while Marie Claire and Winston lay in bed in the next room. He examined the pocket watch and case, an eighteen-carat-gold English Fussee with swing-out movement and a key for winding and changing time. But then he dropped it, causing the faceplate to detach from the base. He was paralyzed with fear, having seen the wrath of Winston’s anger yielded at his mama so many times. He wanted to kick it out the window, as far away as it could go, taking him and his mama with it, away from Winston, away from his violent temper, but he decided instead to hide it under the chair, hoping Winston wouldn’t remember he had brought it with him—he always carried it on his person, and he would remember he had brought it with him.

Buford Tee went to his room and waited. And prayed. When Winston prepared to leave, he realized his watch was missing and accused Marie Claire of stealing it, believing she was taking his possessions and especially money from his wallet while he slept. She tried to convince him it was untrue, but he would hear none of it, slapping her to the floor and threatening to behead her if she ever stole from him again. As she struggled to pull herself up, she noticed the watch beneath the chair. Marie Claire knew what had happened to the watch, knowing how curious her son was about shiny objects, but figured it was no use explaining that to Winston. She would use her earnings from Madame Gypsy’s to buy another pocket watch for Winston. But she knew she couldn’t go on like that, her life in jeopardy as well as her son’s.

***

Prints are available for purchase of the painting “Winston’s Gold Fusee Pocket Watch.”   Prints are available in sizes 8 x 10, 11 x 14, and 16 x 20 inches (unframed).  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com for prices.

Check out the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta–http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com/.

*****

I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.

Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.

Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  Smashwords, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Art Challenge–Painting No. 18

Trouble Down South Art Challenge

Painting No. 18

Day 18

August’s Moonshine Jug

My next paintings will deal with characters and scenes from my Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta.

August Jefferson is a character from Bootlegger Haze (Book One-The Saga).   He learns how to make moonshine from his slave master, Francois.  Read more below.

 

Excerpt

Francois was originally from Kentucky and relocated to Mississippi soon after Everette married Francois’ sister Anne. His ancestors had settled in the Carolina Mountains and then migrated further south into Kentucky for better lands with rich soils for raising crops. They made their living primarily from farming, but in the slow months, they made whiskey from the surplus wheat, rye, and corn. Francois said his grandpapa made whiskey for medicinal purposes and not so much for drinking, but as the demand for spirits grew, his grandpapa’s sole means of income came from making whiskey, particularly for drinking. Francois learned his grandpapa’s whiskey-making operation and began making his own whiskey when he arrived in Mississippi.

No one in the county made whiskey better than Francois, and they were hard-pressed to find any cheaper than his in the surrounding counties. He had a monopoly on the spirit within a three-county radius. He shipped much of his liquor to New Orleans, his largest whiskey market. He would make his bi-weekly trips down the Pearl River into New Orleans. It would take him a day to go and return. As his business grew, he employed a sea captain and several hired hands to ship his cargo safely to and from New Orleans.

August had the duty of manning the whiskey still while Francois was away. It didn’t take August long to learn Francois’s whiskey-making operation, but Francois warned that he, nor any of the slaves, should partake in any of the spirits, lest they be whipped severely. On several occasions August would accompany Francois on his expeditions to New Orleans. August watched carefully and studied every aspect of Francois’s operation. He learned quickly. One day, once a free man, he would run his own whiskey-making operation. He wouldn’t flee, though. He had too much to lose.

***

Prints are available for purchase of the painting “August’s Moonshine Jug.”   Prints are available in sizes 8 x 10, 11 x 14, and 16 x 20 inches (unframed).  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com for prices.

Check out the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta–http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com/.

*****

I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.

Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.

Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  Smashwords, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Art Challenge–Painting No. 17

Trouble Down South Art Challenge

Painting No. 17

IMG_3912

Tulane’s Dress Boot–1895

My next paintings will deal with characters and scenes from my Bootlegger Haze (Books One and Two) for the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta.  Tulane Broussard is a character from Bootlegger Haze (Book One-The Saga).  She befriends Marie Claire Jefferson after meeting her at the Louisiana State Normal School, a college for colored teachers.   After causing Marie Claire and herself to get kicked out of the school, she convinces Marie Claire to become a saloon girl.  Read more below.

Excerpt

Tulane’s strong influence on Marie Claire was evident from their initial encounter, Tulane wasting no time inducting Marie Claire into the cruel realities of adulthood from the fine art of smoking cigarettes to the harsh delights of potent liquors to educating her on the lascivious nature of the opposite sex. The first night they arrived at the school, Tulane convinced Marie Claire to sneak out and follow her to the local saloon. She had seen the saloon on her way into the city and decided it would be her first site of exploration for that evening.

Tulane and Marie Claire stood outside the saloon, watching the crowd of people entering the joint, the clatter of the Steinway piano playing inside the saloon filling the evening air. Tulane pulled out a cigarette and lit it, imitating the fashionably dressed women in hats elaborately adorned in eye-catching confections of flowers and ribbons in the vibrant colors of reds, blues, golds, and blacks. As they sauntered into the saloon on the arms of finely dressed gentlemen in a frock coats, derbies, and top hats, their gloved hands dangled cigarettes from their fingertips, giving them an air of feigned sophistication.

Tulane passed the lit cigarette to Marie Claire who hesitantly took a puff. She inhaled and, without realizing it, swallowed the smoke. She began coughing and gagging, her chest burning inside and her nasal cavity raw from the sting of the smoke that exited her nose and mouth simultaneously. Tulane giggled as Marie Claire struggled for air.

Tulane offered her another cigarette, and Marie Claire, still tasting the bitterness lingering in her mouth, cried out, “No, I don’t want any more of that. That’s the foulest-tasting concoction I’ve ever had.”

“What’s wrong? You ain’t never smoked before?” Tulane asked.

“No, I haven’t,” Marie Claire said timidly, as if she had missed out on some great life-affirming act that other girls her age would have already experienced.

“I’ve been smoking since I was ten,” Tulane said proudly.

“You have? I ain’t never smoked before.”

“You’re a prude.”

“Everyone can’t be as worldly as you,” Marie Claire said, realizing just how sheltered her life had been in comparison to Tulane’s free-spirited upbringing.

“Well, maybe something else is more your fancy,” Tulane said, noticing a gentleman who had come outside the saloon, leaning against the lamppost and lighting a cigarette.

She walked over to him and, from Marie Claire’s vantage point, seemed to cajole the gentlemen into giving her something. A few minutes later she returned to show Marie Claire a flask filled with Wild Turkey Bourbon the man had given her. In thanks for his gift, Tulane waved to the gentleman who was still leaning against the lamppost.

“This is more like it,” Tulane said, twisting the cap and taking a swig of the potent liquor and letting it linger in her mouth for a second, her jaw swollen to lessen the sharpness as it rolled to the back of her mouth.

She swallowed and felt the heat as the liquor made its way down to her stomach. She handed the bottle to Marie Claire, who wasn’t as daring as Tulane, taking a sip at first, the liquor leaving a stinging sensation on the tip of her tongue. She took a bigger swig and this time could feel the kick as the liquor warmed her insides.

“See, nothing to it,” Tulane said, smiling at Marie Claire.

“Hum,” Marie Claire said, feeling the intoxicating effects take root.

They spent the evening smoking, drinking, and watching the parade of men and women exiting and entering the saloon. They drank the entire contents of the bottle, Tulane consuming the better portion of it, until they were fully intoxicated. By early morning, they made their way back to the schoolhouse, sneaking into their rooms, unnoticed.

***

Prints are available for purchase of the painting “Tulane’s Dress Boot–1895.”   Prints are available in sizes 8 x 10, 11 x 14, and 16 x 20 inches (unframed).  Email Katrina Williams at stepartdesigns at hotmail dot com for prices.

Check out the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge with Leslie Saeta–http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com/.

*****

I am an artist and an author of southern and historical fiction and short stories.  View all my artwork on my artist page at Daily Paintworks.

Check out more of my artwork at my Art Blog–KPWms Art Studio.

Also check out my novels and short stories.  Katrina Parker Williams’ Books Available at Amazon,  Smashwords, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes).

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 914 other followers

%d bloggers like this: